This list of books is limited to those that I use often, or enjoyed reading, or just enjoy having around my office for those occasions when I just need to look at paper not pixels. They are all highly recommended. 

REMOTE SENSING FOR GEOSCIENTISTS: IMAGE ANALYSIS AND INTEGRATION, THIRD EDITION

by Gary L. Prost

An epic, comprehensive look at the use of remote sensing imagery in geoscience. Includes a small section by Matt. And Gary is one of the 52 Things... Geology authors, so you know he's awesome!

TO INTERPRET THE EARTH: TEN WAYS TO BE WRONG

by Stanley A. Schumm

A short and readable gem for the thinking geoscientist (if there are other kinds!). Some highlights from the table of contents: Differential diagnosis, Falsification, Divergence, Convergence, Multiplicity. A must-read.

EARTH: AN INTIMATE HISTORY

by Richard Fortey

The palaeontologist Richard Fortey is a thoughtful and engaging writer. He's written several books, mostly on more palaeontological subjects. 

BEAUTIFUL EVIDENCE

by Edward R. Tufte

The most recent, and most eclectic, of Tufte's books. Brilliant.

ENVISIONING INFORMATION

by Edward R. Tufte

The second of Tufte's books. Buy it.

VISUAL EXPLANATIONS: IMAGES AND QUANTITIES, EVIDENCE AND NARRATIVE

by Edward R. Tufte

The third of Tufte's incredible books. Buy it.

THE VISUAL DISPLAY OF QUANTITATIVE INFORMATION, 2ND EDITION

by Edward R. Tufte

The first of Edward Tufte's masterpieces on data and information. Buy it.

COMMUNICATING ROCKS: WRITING, SPEAKING, AND THINKING ABOUT GEOLOGY

by Peter Copeland

An affordable manual of geo-syle. University of Houston professor of geology sets out some guidance for authors, presenters, and grant-application-writers in the geosciences. 

CANADA ROCKS: THE GEOLOGIC JOURNEY

by Nick Eyles, Andrew Miall

The recent epic covering Canada's geological past. Fun to read or flick through.

THE LAST BILLION YEARS: A GEOLOGICAL HISTORY OF THE MARITIME PROVINCES OF CANADA

by Atlantic Geoscience Society

An excellent book about the geological history of the Atlantic provinces; along the line Canada Rocks (see above).

THE PRIZE: THE EPIC QUEST FOR OIL, MONEY & POWER

by Daniel Yergin

A great read, and required reading for those in the industry. I almost never read books with no pictures, or books this long, but this one was worth the effort. The first half is especially fascinating. 

THE MAP THAT CHANGED THE WORLD: WILLIAM SMITH AND THE BIRTH OF MODERN GEOLOGY (P.S.)

by Simon Winchester

The recent geology classic by a geologist-turned-journalist. I found it a bit doting, but it's a well-told story nonetheless.

THE VISUAL MISCELLANEUM: A COLORFUL GUIDE TO THE WORLD'S MOST CONSEQUENTIAL TRIVIA

by David McCandless

Bold compendium of infographics by David McCandless; not all of them work, but fun to browse.

DESIGNED MAPS: A SOURCEBOOK FOR GIS USERS

by Cynthia A Brewer

If you use ESRI's ArcGIS software, or are just interested in technical cartography, this is a good read. Full of interesting examples of specialist maps, in a great one-per-spread format. Includes lots of practical tips for ArcGIS users. 

3-D SEISMIC INTERPRETATION

by M. Bacon, R. Simm, T. Redshaw

Very nice source book on seismic interpretation, but rather expensive like most technical volumes. Especially good for beginners and technologists. 

QUANTITATIVE SEISMIC INTERPRETATION: APPLYING ROCK PHYSICS TOOLS TO REDUCE INTERPRETATION RISK

by Per Avseth, Tapan Mukerji, Gary Mavko

Well-written, perhaps indispensable, guide for anyone interested in rock physics and AVO analysis. 

THE MISADVENTURES OF INTERPRETER SAM (GEOPHYSICAL MONOGRAPH NO. 15) (SEG GEOPHYSICAL MONOGRAPH SERIES)

by Donald A. Herron

Just a great read for any geophysicist, seismic interpreter, or explorationist.

NOISE

by Bart Kosko

A fun read for geophysicists, this book is partly pop-sci, especially early on, but gets more technical, delving into things like noise colour, filters and stochastic resonance. Recommended.

IN PURSUIT OF THE UNKNOWN: 17 EQUATIONS THAT CHANGED THE WORLD

by Ian Stewart

An approachable, lively and informative guide to the mathematical building blocks that form the foundations of modern life, In Pursuit of the Unknown is also a penetrating exploration of how we have long used equations to make sense of, and in turn influence our world. 

THE WORLD ACCORDING TO WAVELETS: THE STORY OF A MATHEMATICAL TECHNIQUE IN THE MAKING, SECOND EDITION

by Barbara Burke Hubbard

I know it sounds boring, but this book is excellent. Its a non-specialist's guide to wavelets, but also a great introduction to signal processing. Very accessible to any technical person, not just mathematicians and 'real' geophysicists.

 

MUNSELL® COLOR GEOLOGICAL ROCK-COLOR CHART 2009 REVISED WASHABLE EDITION

If you spend a lot of time looking at core or outcrop, you probably need one of these. If you think you're pretty good at describing colours, try this out

 

THERE ARE TWO ERRORS IN THE THE TITLE OF THIS BOOK: A SOURCEBOOK OF PHILOSOPHICAL PUZZLES, PARADOXES AND PROBLEMS - REVISED AND EXPANDED

by Robert M. Martin

One of my favourite books of all time.

INTUITION: ITS POWERS AND PERILS (YALE NOTA BENE)

by Professor David G. Myers

A great read by a bona fide researcher in the field. For me, this book started a deep interest in the dangers, mostly, of intuitive problem solving. 

NEW HART'S RULES: THE HANDBOOK OF STYLE FOR WRITERS AND EDITORS (REFERENCE)

Oxford University Press, USA

If you write or edit in English, especially British English, I highly recommend this little book. As with most things, I tend to follow it in spirit, if not in letter.

THE CRAFTSMAN

by Richard Sennett

A beautifully written book about professionalism. It truly changed how I think about my work.